English Literature

Wide Sargasso Sea and Jane Eyre

In this course, we explore Jean Rhys' 'Wide Sargasso Sea' alongside 'Jane Eyre'. Written as a prequel to 'Jane Eyre', 'Wide Sargasso Sea' shares many of the same themes (not to mention characters) as Bronte's novel. In this course, we...

Ms Janelle Rodriques

Newcastle University

English Literature

Shakespeare and History

In this course, we explore the concept of history in Shakespeare, looking in particular at six key plays: King Lear, Richard II, Twelfth Night, Titus Andronicus, Hamlet, The Tempest. The course begins by considering the idea of narrative in history....

Dr Harriet Archer

Newcastle University

Classics & Ancient History

Tacitus: Annals: Book 15

In this course, Dr Ed Bispham (University of Oxford) explores Book 15 of Tacitus' Annals. We begin by considering Tacitus as a historian. How does he construct his history, and how much can we trust him? We then give a...

Dr Ed Bispham

Oxford University

English Literature

Poetry: Introduction to Poetic Form

In this course, we look at the use of form in poetry. The purpose of this course is to demonstrate the many ways in which the form of a poem can convey meaning. This includes the use forms that are...

Ms Stephanie Yorke

Oxford University

History

Liberals and Conservatives, 1846-95

This course explores British politics from 1846 to 1895, focusing in particular on five key figures - Sir Robert Peel, Benjamin Disraeli, Lord Palmerston, William Gladstone, and Lord Salisbury - and dealing with the central issues of the period: political...

Mr Edward Hicks

Oxford University

History

The USA and Japan, 1941-52

In this course, we explore the relationship between the United States and Japan between the attack on Pearl Harbour to the San Francisco Peace Conference and the end of US occupation of Japan. In six modules, we explore the relationship...

Dr Christopher Harding

Edinburgh University

Classics & Ancient History

Euripides: Medea

In this module, we explore Euripides' Medea, a tragedy in which a Medea kills her own children to get back at Jason, who has left her for another woman. The course begins by looking at the myth of Medea and...

Dr Lucy Jackson

King's College, London

Philosophy

The Philosophy of Equality

At least since the French Revolution, equality has served as one of the leading ideals of the body politic, and today remains one of the key tenets in modern Western democracies. But is equality always a good thing? Is it...

Dr Nikolas Kirby

Oxford University

Philosophy

Utilitarianism

Utilitarianism is the belief that the right action is the one that maximises happiness. The philosophy theory has its origins in the hedonism of Aristippus and Epicurus, though reached its most well-known form in the writings of Jeremy Bentham and...

Dr Claire Benn

Van Leer Jerusalem Institute

Philosophy

Classics & Ancient History

Plato: Euthyphro and Meno

This course examines the life of Socrates, before looking at his famous philosophical method and asking, why was Socrates so interested in defining what things mean? After this, we look more closely at two early dialogues of Plato which feature...

Dr Nakul Krishna

Cambridge University

Philosophy

Nietzsche: On the Genealogy of Morality

Published in 1887, the Genealogy of Morality is the locus classicus of Nietzsche's criticism of contemporary morality and religion. The book is divided into three essays: the first deals with the origins of Christian and contemporary secular morality; the second...

Mr Ben Martin

Oxford University

English Literature

The Medieval Revival in Victorian Literature

This wide-ranging course examines why so many writers and artists of the Victorian period were so obsessed with the Middle Ages, a concept known as 'Medievalism'. We begin by exploring the work of Walter Scott, whose pseudo-historical novels such as...

Dr Gabriel Schenk

Oxford University