Classics & Ancient History

The history, literature, culture, philosophy and languages of Ancient Greece and Rome.

Classics & Ancient History

Sophocles: Oedipus Tyrannus

Sophocles: Oedipus Tyrannus

In this course, Professor Richard Seaford (University of Exeter) explores Sophocles' Oedipus Tyrannus. We begin by thinking about the plot of the play, focusing in particular on the Aristotelian concepts of reversal and recognition, as well as the ...

Prof. Richard Seaford

Exeter University

English Literature

Classics & Ancient History

Tragedy: A Complete History

Tragedy: A Complete History

In this course, Professor John Lennard explores the history of tragedy from its origins in ancient Athens to the present day. In the first three modules, we think about the tragedy of Classical Athens, looking in particular at the plays...

Prof. John Lennard

Independent Scholar

Classics & Ancient History

Euripides: Bacchae

Euripides: Bacchae

In this course, Professor Richard Seaford (University of Exeter) explores Euripides' great tragedy, The Bacchae, which ends with the king of Thebes, Pentheus, being torn to pieces by his own mother, Agave. In the first module, we think about the...

Prof. Richard Seaford

Exeter University

Classics & Ancient History

Sophocles: Oedipus Tyrannus

Sophocles: Oedipus Tyrannus

In this course, Dr Rosie Wyles (University of Kent) explores Sophocles' Oedipus Tyrannus. In the first module, we think about where Sophocles chooses to start the story and how it proceeds, compared to other versions of the myth. After that,...

Dr Rosie Wyles

Kent University

Classics & Ancient History

Greek Theatre: Music

Greek Theatre: Music

In this course, Dr Armand D’Angour (University of Oxford) explores the use of music in ancient tragedy, thinking in particular about the kinds of musical instruments that were used, the metre, rhythm, and melodies of tragic poetry. The course ends...

Dr Armand D'Angour

Oxford University

Classics & Ancient History

Greek Theatre: Ritual and Religion

Greek Theatre: Ritual and Religion

In this course, Professor Richard Seaford (University of Exeter) explores the importance of ritual and religion in Greek tragedy. Having begun with a discussion of the god Dionysus and his cult in Attica, as well as the supposed origins of...

Prof. Richard Seaford

Exeter University

Classics & Ancient History

Aristophanes

Aristophanes

In this course, Dr Rosie Wyles (University of Kent) provides a critical study of three plays of Aristophanes – The Acharnians (425 BC), The Knights (424 BC) and Peace (421 BC) – in their theatrical, religious, social, and political context. In particular, we ...

Dr Rosie Wyles

Kent University

Classics & Ancient History

Aristophanes: Frogs

Aristophanes: Frogs

This course provides close reading and analysis of Aristophanes’ Frogs, focusing on the prescribed material for the OCR A-Level in Classical Greek. All passages are presented in the original Greek with a facing English translation, while commentary includes discussion of...

Dr Rosie Wyles

Kent University

Classics & Ancient History

Aristophanes

Aristophanes

In this course, Prof. Edith Hall (King's College, London) provides an introduction to the plays of Aristophanes, thinking in particular about the world that Aristophanes lived in and his comic output and focusing in particular on: the link between comedy ...

Prof. Edith Hall

King's College, London

Classics & Ancient History

Greek Theatre: The Chorus

Greek Theatre: The Chorus

For modern readers, the chorus is one of the most challenging aspects of Greek drama. Yet the chorus is an integral feature of both tragedy and comedy, and to engage fully with the plays, it’s essential to understand the role...

Dr Laura Swift

Open University

Classics & Ancient History

Greek Theatre

Greek Theatre

In this course, we explore fifth-century Greek theatre, focusing in particular on the plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes. In this course, we look at key dramatic conventions of fifth-century theatre, the relationship between the tragedy/comedy and contemporary politics...

Dr Rosie Wyles

Kent University