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English Literature

Shakespeare: Twelfth Night

In this course, we explore several aspects of Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night. We begin by thinking about the play’s status as a comedy, before looking at a number of aspects of the play and its performance. In particular, we explore the...

6 lectures

1:00:42

Dr Sophie Duncan

Oxford University

Classics & Ancient History

Homer: The Worlds of the Iliad and Odyssey

In a special set of two lectures, Dr Elton Barker (Open University) explores the worlds of the Homeric epics, suggesting in particular that both the Iliad and the Odyssey question the use of violence as a means of conflict-resolution. In...

2 lectures

0:31:24

Dr Elton Barker

Open University

History

The Reign of Richard I, 1189-99

In this course, Dr Hugh Doherty (University of East Anglia) explores the reign of King Richard I (1189-99). We begin by considering Richard's reputation among modern historians, focusing in particular on the three main criticism levelled at the...

6 lectures

0:39:03

Dr Hugh Doherty

University of East Anglia

English Literature

Classics & Ancient History

Seneca and Early Modern Drama

Shakespeare’s most famous – and infamous – tragedies draw on the Roman playwright Seneca for their dramatic form and theatrical style - including ‘Hamlet’, ‘King Lear’, and ‘Titus Andronicus’. Seneca also had a huge influence on Shakespeare’s...

8 lectures

1:41:53

Dr Helen Slaney

Oxford University

Classics & Ancient History

Homer: Odyssey

In this course, Professor Richard Jenkyns (University of Oxford) explores Homer's Odyssey. We begin by thinking about the nature of the poem, focusing in particular on the nature of oral poetry and the Odyssey's relationship (if any) with the...

5 lectures

0:43:41

Prof. Richard Jenkyns

Oxford University

History

The Tudors – Henry VIII and the English Reformation, 1509-47

In this course, Dr Tracey Sowerby (University of Oxford) explores the reign of Henry VIII, thinking in particular about the English Reformation. We begin by focusing on decision-making in the Henrician court, before looking at the reasons behind...

5 lectures

0:59:15

Dr Tracey Sowerby

Oxford University

English Literature

History

Milton and the English Civil War: Charles I

This course provides key historical context for John Milton's 'Paradise Lost', looking in particular at the figure of Charles I. The course is divided into nine parts. The first seven look at Charles' early years (1600-25), his early reign...

9 lectures

0:54:54

Prof. Diane Purkiss

Oxford University

English Literature

The Poetry of John Keats

In this course, Professor Jon Mee (University of York) explores the life and poetry of the great Romantic poet, John Keats. We begin by looking at Keats’ background, including his family, early education, and his career, before exploring Keats’...

7 lectures

0:39:56

Prof. Jon Mee

York University

English Literature

Morrison: Beloved

In this course, Professor Gina Wisker (University of Brighton) explores Toni Morrison's 1987 novel, Beloved. We begin by providing a broad introduction to Black women's writing, focusing in particular on the works of Alice Walker, Zora Neale...

6 lectures

0:50:28

Prof. Gina Wisker

Brighton University

English Literature

Ford: 'Tis Pity She’s a Whore

In this course, Professor John Lennard explores John Ford’s 17th-century tragedy, ‘Tis Pity She’s a Whore. The course begins by thinking about john Ford himself, about whom we know very little, and his literary output, before moving on to explore...

5 lectures

0:51:54

Prof. John Lennard

Independent Scholar

History

Russia: The End of Imperial Russia, 1894-1917

In this course, Professor Peter Waldron (University of East Anglia) explores the end of Tsarist Russia, tracing events from the beginning of Nicholas II's reign in 1894 to the Revolutions of 1917 that saw the rise of Lenin, Trotsky and...

5 lectures

0:57:52

Prof. Peter Waldron

University of East Anglia

English Literature

Steinbeck: The Grapes of Wrath

In this course, Dr Sarah Robertson (University of West England) explores John Steinbeck’s 1939 novel, The Grapes of Wrath. We begin by providing some historical context to the novel, focusing in particular on the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl...

4 lectures

0:36:52

Dr Sarah Robertson

UWE Bristol

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